POSSIBLE BENEFITS OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAL INFECTION OF CONIFER SEEDLINGS AT ALTA SKI AREA

  • Anna Melis Albertsen University of Utah
  • Jennifer Follstad Shah University of Utah
  • Jennifer H. Watt University of Utah

Abstract

Studying tree survival rates of conifers planted at Alta has shown that the project is struggling in terms of survival. I wanted to extend this research and see if there are any measurable benefits of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root infection. I completed this research by harvesting small conifer specimens at Alta Ski Area, doing a series of analysis to define the health of each specimen, and then performing root analysis to determine the percent of ECM infection. Then by doing comparative analysis of these data I hoped to find that healthier plants had increased ECM infection percentages. I have not found that there is any significant connection between the two. This result leads me to believe benefits of ECM infection may be more in relation to ecosystem stability, and encourages me to ask more questions.

Author Biographies

Anna Melis Albertsen, University of Utah
I am a senior in the College of Social and Behavioral Science, majoring in Environmental and Sustainability Studies.
Jennifer Follstad Shah, University of Utah
Assistant Professor (Lecturer), Environmental & Sustainability, University of UtahResearch Assistant Professor, Geography Department, University of UtahAcademic Advisor, Environmental and Sustainability Studies, University of Utah
Jennifer H. Watt, University of Utah
Associate Director, Environmental and Sustainability Studies, University of UtahAssistant Professor (Lecturer), Environmental and Sustainability Studies, University of UtahAssistant Professor (Lecturer), Environmental & Sustainability, University of UtahAdjunct Assistant Professor, Geography Department, University of Utah
Published
2017-06-08
How to Cite
ALBERTSEN, Anna Melis; FOLLSTAD SHAH, Jennifer; WATT, Jennifer H.. POSSIBLE BENEFITS OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAL INFECTION OF CONIFER SEEDLINGS AT ALTA SKI AREA. Undergraduate Research Journal, [S.l.], june 2017. Available at: <http://epubs.utah.edu/index.php/URJ/article/view/3625>. Date accessed: 24 aug. 2017.
Issue
Section
College of Social & Behavioral Science

Keywords

Ectomycorrhizal fungi; symbiosis