THE FLAWED LOGIC OF CONGRESS IN THE ECONOMIC STIMULUS ACT OF 2008

Abstract

On February 13, 2008, President Bush signed into law the Economic Stimulus Act of 2008. The bill was highly publicized, and sped through the legislative process in a mere seventeen days. This quick enactment was accomplished through tremendous bipartisan efforts and extensive cooperation between the legislative branch and the executive branch. While nearly every politician approved the bill, and lauded the great effect it would have on families and the economy, in reality it did little but cost the government (and taxpaying citizens) $152 billion. The passage of this bill came in the midst of a struggling economy, and Congress intended it to stimulate the economy and avoid or mitigate a recession. As can be seen from the events that have occured since the bill was signed into law, it has failed. This Note makes a painfully obvious observation that the bill never had a fighting chance to accomplish its desired objectives because of the flawed logic of Congress. This will be readily apparent by first looking at what the bill provided; second, looking at the purposes behind the provisions; and third, by pointing out the disconnect between the means Congress used and the desired ends. This Note concludes by suggesting that the best action for Congress in times of economic trouble is to do nothing.  
How to Cite
. THE FLAWED LOGIC OF CONGRESS IN THE ECONOMIC STIMULUS ACT OF 2008. Journal of Law and Family Studies, [S.l.], v. 12, n. 1, mar. 2010. Available at: <http://epubs.utah.edu/index.php/jlfs/article/view/293>. Date accessed: 25 nov. 2017.
Section
Statute Note