Locking Up Children: Lessons from the T. Don Hutto Family Detention Center

Abstract

The history of detaining immigrant families together in jail cells is short as the practice is a new development in immigration policy. In 2006, the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement ("ICE") opened a detention facility for the express purpose of detaining alien families. The structure, known as the T. Don Hutto Family Residential Facility ("Hutto"), was converted from a failing medium-security prison, yet continued to look and function as a penal facility. By March 2007, the structure held approximately two-hundred children, along with their family members, of which the majority were awaiting asylum hearings. ICE provided very limited schooling opportunities, forced the children to wear prison garb; and allowed guards-trained to work in the adult prison system-to correct and punish the families.
How to Cite
. Locking Up Children: Lessons from the T. Don Hutto Family Detention Center. Journal of Law and Family Studies, [S.l.], v. 11, n. 1, feb. 2009. Available at: <http://epubs.utah.edu/index.php/jlfs/article/view/91>. Date accessed: 24 nov. 2017.
Section
Study Notes