Virtual Parents: How Virtual Visitation Legislation Is Shaping the Future of Custody Law

Abstract

Following Michael Gough's divorce in 2002, his ex-wife wanted to move to Wisconsin with their four-year-old daughter. Michael's work obligations kept him in Utah, yet he longed to sustain a significant relationship with his daughter in spite of the distance. Gough, a computer security specialist, arrived at his custody hearing with two laptops and demonstrated to the court how easy-to-use video conferencing technology could connect him over the internet with his daughter at minimal cost. Though the judge was unfamiliar with this novel technology, Gough persuaded the court to grant him virtual visitation rights in addition to traditional visitation. Gough subsequently presented a seminar to the Family Law section of the Utah State Bar with the help of Salt Lake City attorney Joyce Maughan. "One of the attorneys present . . . was so impressed that he proposed legislation" in Gough's daughter's name creating a presumption in favor of virtual visitation in custody cases.  
How to Cite
. Virtual Parents: How Virtual Visitation Legislation Is Shaping the Future of Custody Law. Journal of Law and Family Studies, [S.l.], v. 11, n. 1, feb. 2009. Available at: <http://epubs.utah.edu/index.php/jlfs/article/view/95>. Date accessed: 25 nov. 2017.
Section
Statute Note