This Pussy Grabs Back: Body Rhetoric at the Women’s March on Washington

  • Karyn Keane Longwood University

Abstract

Modes of social protest often utilize verbal and written forms of communication. Societal criticisms like Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech and Upton Sinclair’s book, The Jungle, have stood the test of time and are still regarded as historically significant; however, body rhetoric serves as another valuable form of protest and advocacy.

Author Biography

Karyn Keane, Longwood University
Karyn Keane is a junior in the Cormier Honors College of Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. She is an English major with a concentration in Rhetoric and Professional Writing and a minor in Children’s Literature. Her academic interests include pop culture, writing studies, public memory, and rhetoric. In addition to her English-focused studies, she is a reader for The Omnipedia Review and regularly contributes pieces to the Farmville-Downtown Partnership. Her other publications include “Partial, Partisan, Contested: Public Memory at the National Museum of African American History and Culture” and “Nasty Women: Grendel’s Mother and Wealhtheow as Equal Depictions of Femininity.” She will also present her research on the National Museum of African American History and Culture at the 2018 National Collegiate Honors Conference. After graduating from Longwood in May 2020, she hopes to pursue a doctorate in Composition and Rhetoric with the eventual goal of becoming a college professor. 
Published
2018-10-15
How to Cite
KEANE, Karyn. This Pussy Grabs Back: Body Rhetoric at the Women’s March on Washington. Undergraduate Journal of Contemporary Issues and Media, [S.l.], v. 1, n. 1, oct. 2018. Available at: <http://epubs.utah.edu/index.php/ujcim/article/view/4135>. Date accessed: 16 nov. 2018.
Section
Articles